Dr. Sadlier honoured by ethnic press


Dr. Rosemary Sadlier is flanked by Thomas Saras, National Ethnic Press and Media Council president, and Maria Saras-Voutsinas, executive director. By Gerald V. Paul
Dr. Rosemary Sadlier is flanked by Thomas Saras, National Ethnic Press and Media Council president, and Maria Saras-Voutsinas, executive director.
By Gerald V. Paul

Former president of the Ontario Black History Society (OBHS) Dr. Rosemary Sadlier was honoured by the National Ethnic Press and Media Council of Canada for her contributions to Black History, Human Rights, and Social Justice.
“For 25 years, it has been my honour and privilege to serve the people of Ontario through the OBHS as a volunteer,” Sadlier, a recipient of the Order of Ontario, told The Camera.
She said that as the only provincial heritage organization of the government of Ontario dedicated to Black history for African, Black, Caribbean and wider communities, she was happy to serve all members of the community during their various events and functions.
She noted that in the 1950’s the Canadian Negro Women’s Association brought the celebration of Black History Month to Toronto. “By 1978, OBHS successfully petitioned the City of Toronto to have the celebration formally recognized. This celebration is currently proclaimed across Canada.”
The prolific author and educator said that when the contributions of people of African descent are acknowledged, when the achievements of Black people are known, when Black people are routinely included or affirmed through our curriculum, our books and the media, and treated with equality, “then there will no longer be a need for Black History Month.”
Sadlier was also designated by the Canadian Teachers Federation as one of 12 global defenders of human rights in Canada, based on criteria established by Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Speak Truth to Power initiative.
This year at the OBHS Black History Month celebration, Sadlier noted, “It is important that we recognize the founders of the OBHS and the initiators of the OBHS brunch. We have built on a solid foundation.
“I express well wishes to the new OBHS team as it leads the organization into a new era.
“The culture and history of African Canadians must remain central to all future endeavours and should supersede the individual’s personal agendas. For whom much is given, much is required.”
Incoming president of the OBHS Nikki Clarke was an instructor at Sheridan College in the faculty of Early Childhood Education, the School of Business and Community Development.
She started the company Bead 4 Health in which she designs and handcrafts organic jewelry for men and women, is a singer / songwriter is also involved in television.

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